A Report on Non-Ionizing Radiation

China: Microwave News Article Archive (2004 - )

October 12, 2017

Chinese group finds statistically significant link. Back in 2001, Pierre Aubineau had a mechanism to explain how cell phone RF could cause headaches. But an industry-friendly colleague silenced him.

March 4, 2017

From China. The third recent meta-analysis that points to a cancer risk. Here are links to all three.

March 9, 2016

“Our results suggest that certain aspects of cell phone use may negatively affect sperm quality in men by decreasing the semen volume, sperm concentration, or sperm count, thus impairing male fertility.” Click here for more on the growing literature detailing effects on fertility.

May 16, 2015

“[T]here was a consistent significant association between MP use and fatigue in children.” But, the study design “could not adequately reveal” causality. (Open access)

January 20, 2015

“[T]his is the first study to demonstarte that 900 MHz EMF affected spatial memory in rats exposed to EMF for 28 days but not in rats exposed to EMFs for 14 days.” … Also “provides evidence that 900 MHz [EMFs] resulted in the disruption of BBB permeability…” From China’s 3rd Military Medical University in Chongqing.

July 19, 2014

“[Our analysis] indicated that, for the premenopausal group, the occurrence of breast cancer may be related to exposure to ELF-EMFs, but for the menopausal group it has no relationship. The specific mechanism still requires further study. … It is suggested that premenopausal female should minimize exposure to ELF-EMFs.” From China.

May 30, 2014

“Our studies also emphasize that many more studies are urgently required to address the potentially hazardous effects of RF-EMF exposure on brain development.” From a Chinese military lab in Chongqing.

April 26, 2014

“The observations in the studies reviewed … suggested that RF exposure was beneficial and able to provide resistance in animals and human cells to the damage induced by subsequent exposure to sub-lethal and lethal doses of ionizing radiation and chemical mutage.” From China, open access.

April 7, 2014

“[A]lthough the defined effect of mobile phone use on semen quality cannot be concluded from the existing studies, men should not keep mobile phone in their trousers pockets or near testicles to avoid the potential harmful effect of RF radiation on the male reproductive system.” From the 3rd Military University in Chongqing, China.

February 25, 2014

Five years ago we reported on what we thought was an important clue in the search for understanding the well-documented association between childhood leukemia and EMF exposure. A team based in Shanghai presented evidence that children carrying a genetic variation linked to DNA repair were four times more likely to develop leukemia than those without that genetic marker. We called the finding a “major breakthrough” and predicted, “It simply cannot be ignored.”

We were wrong. So wrong.

What happened next —or rather, what did not happen— sheds light on why EMF research treads water and never moves forward.

January 17, 2014

More support for an association for exposures above 0.2 μT (2 mG) —from a group in China. See also the accompanying editorial which finds that this potential risk factor “deserves our attention.”

September 6, 2013

“The results suggest that EMF exposure may be associated with the increase risk of male breast cancer…” (open access).

August 19, 2013

“[H]ands-free devices might reduce the MPR exposure intensity to the human head. However … the male reproductive system may be put into risks. Thus, it is important and urgent to establish feasible and effective strategies to prevent reproductive impairment following daily exposure to MPR. Significantly increased levels of DNA damage in the “dialing” and “dialed” modes were found in the present study…”

July 15, 2013

“The results of the current study suggest that there is a significant association between power EMF exposure and poor performance on neurobehavioral … tests.” From China, open access.

June 17, 2013

“[S]inusoidal EMFs inhibit osteoblast proliferation while square EMFs promote osteoblast proliferation. While the square and serrated EMFs have no appreciable effects on osteogenesis, triangular and sinusoidal EMFs enhance the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts, with triangular EMFs being the most potent waveform.” Based on 50 Hz exposures at 1.8 mT (18 G) —from Lanzhou, China.

January 31, 2013

PLoS1, published online January 23, 2013, from Zhengping Xu's lab in Hangzhou, China.

November 30, 2012

PLoS1, published online November 26, 2012. From Zheijang University in Hangzhou, China: "Our data suggest a slight but significant ALS risk increase among those with job titles related to relatively high levels of ELF-EMF exposure."

November 22, 2012

PLoS1, September 2012. Effects following exposure to 120 μW/cm² for 1 hr a day for 3 days. From China.

August 14, 2012

Asian-Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention, 2011 (open access).

May 15, 2009

There are many reasons not to use a cell phone in an elevator. The most obvious would be as a courtesy to other passengers. Another is that a phone has to work harder in a shielded space. It's forced to operate at higher power levels for the signal to get out and reach the nearest tower and that leads to more ambient radiation in the elevator.

What most cell phone users would never consider is that a fellow passenger absorbs some of the radiation that would otherwise bounce back off the walls. It turns out, according to some new calculations from Japan, that a lone user can get a maximum exposure of about 1.6 W/Kg, 80% of the ICNIRP standard (2 W/Kg). But be advised that exposures could exceed the current U.S. FCC standard by a wide margin, under worst-case conditions. (This is a rare —no, unique— example of an American EMF standard being stricter than those in other countries.) The FCC limit is averaged over only 1g of tissue and, as Jim Lin, a member of ICNIRP, has often pointed out, increasing the averaging volume from 1 g to 10 g could triple the allowable radiation exposure (see MWN, N/D00, p.3). These new findings appear in the May issue of the IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques.

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