A Report on Non-Ionizing Radiation

Plus Ça Change…

December 4, 2012

Another in our continuing series  —Nothing Ever Really Changes. 

We recently came across an item in the January 20, 1964, issue of Newsweek titled, "The Mrs. G Effect" about a California housewife, who could hear noises that no one else could hear.

An "expert" was brought in. As far as he could tell, Mrs. G was converting alternating current fields into sound signals "as though she were a radio receiver." Newsweek also talked to Allan Frey who offered qualified support. "If you use the correct frequency and modulate it properly, it's easy to induce sensations," Frey told the magazine. "But how it is perceived, it's too early to tell." Frey had authority in these matters because three years earlier he was the first to report people's ability to hear certain types of microwaves. Many now call this the "Frey effect."

A few days ago —or forty-nine years later— we called Frey and reminded him about the Newsweek article. It was not fresh in his mind! "I don't know what they measured, so I don't know what to conclude," he said, but he did allow that Mrs. G was probably hearing low frequency, not microwave, signals.

Mrs. G's condition is no different from what we now call electromagnetic hypersensitivity, Frey told us.

 

For another reminiscence, see "The Man Who Was Allergic to Radio Waves."