A Report on Non-Ionizing Radiation

geomagnetic fields: Microwave News Article Archive (2004 - )

February 16, 2019

“Blue Light-Dependent Human Magnetoreception in Geomagnetic Food Orientation,” PLoS1, online February 14, 2019.

“Blue-light dependent human magnetoreception occurs in the eyes in a manner that appears to involve the brain and glucose.” From Korea; open access.

June 18, 2015

“Magnetosensitive Neurons Mediate Geomagnetic Orientation in C. elegans,” eLIFE, posted online June 17, 2015.

“Our findings that the direction of vertical migrations could be reversed by an imposed magnetic field and that wild-type populations of worms from opposite hemispheres displayed opposite vertical migration preference strongly suggests that C. elegans relies on the geomagnetic field rather than gravity.” (open access).

June 28, 2011

Birds do it, butterflies do it, and now we learn that people may do it too. A group at the University of Massachusetts Medical School led by neurobiologist Steven Reppert reports that humans can sense the Earth's magnetic field. The finding prompts the team to suggest "a reassessment of human magnetosensivitiy may be in order." Check out the story...

Birds do it, butterflies do it, and now we learn that people may do it too. A group at the University of Massachusetts Medical School led by neurobiologist Steven Reppert reports that humans can sense the Earth's magnetic field. The finding prompts the team to suggest "a reassessment of human magnetosensivitiy may be in order." Check out the story...

September 26, 2007

Birds may actually be able to "see" a magnetic field. This is the fascinating and surprising conclusion of a group of German scientists who have been studying migratory birds. Not everyone is yet convinced that garden warblers can visualize the geomagnetic field (see today's news item on Nature.com), but the new German paper reminds us how little about we know about how living systems interact with electromagnetic signals.

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