A Report on Non-Ionizing Radiation

microwave weapons: Microwave News Article Archive (2004 - )

December 22, 2020

“A CIA Officer Has a Headache. Media Blame Russia,” FAIR, December 16, 2020. A very different take on the GQ magazine article: “The Mystery of Immaculate Concussion.” Throws cold water on the hype over “some sort of hitherto unheard-of Kremlin microwave gun” and asks: “Why is there so little skepticism of fanciful official claims in corporate media?”

December 5, 2020

“An Assessment of Illness in U.S. Government Employees and Their Families at Overseas Embassies,” National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Released December 5, 2020. “Overall, directed pulsed RF energy, especially in those with the distinct early manifestations, appears to be the most plausible mechanism in explaining these case.” See also this thread of nine tweets.

July 24, 2019

“Neuroimaging Findings in U.S. Government Personnel With Possible Exposure to Directional Phenomena in Havana, Cuba,” JAMA, July 23/30, 2019.

“…advanced brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant differences in whole brain white matter volume, regional gray and white matter volumes, cerebellar tissue microstructural integrity…”

September 6, 2018

“Scientists and Doctors Zap Theory that Microwave Weapon Injured Cuba Diplomats,” Washington Post, September 6, 2018.”

Challenges NYTimes report (below). “No microwave weapon that affects the brain is known to exist.”

September 2, 2018

“Microwave Weapons Are Prime Suspect in Ills of U.S. Embassy Workers,” New York Times, September 1, 2018.

“Strikes with microwaves, some experts now argue, more plausibly explain reports of painful sounds, ills and traumas than do other possible culprits — sonic attacks, viral infections and contagious anxiety.” (Front page, print edition, September 2.)

September 12, 2012

“Microwave Weapons: Wasted Energy,”

Nature, September 12, 2012, by Sharon Weinberger. See also the accompanying editorial, “Secret Weapons.”

January 12, 2007

Are they victims of mind-control dirty tricks or are they simply nuts? Sharon Weinberger presents the stories of a number of TIs —targeted individuals who believe they are being assaulted by electromagnetic weapons— in Sunday's (January 14) Washington Post magazine. Her cover story, "Mind Games," centers on Harlan Girard, who for many years has run the International Committee on Offensive Microwave Weapons out of his home in Philadelphia.

December 8, 2006

Over the last few years, microwave researchers at the Brooks Air Force Base in San Antonio have published a series of papers showing that 94 GHz millimeter waves have minimal effects on the eyes and the skin, and that current models are adequate for predicting pain and thermal thresholds. It has been no secret that this work was to support the military's development of a microwave weapon for crowd control — active denial technology. After all, how else would people be exposed to 94 GHz radiation?

August 14, 2006

Scientists from New Zealand, the U.K. and Finland are worried about a different kind of electromagnetic weapon: One that could wreck havoc with the world's communications systems —think HAARP run by a Herman Kahn wannabe. Check out the press release issued today by the University of Otago. For background, see "Nuclear Explosions in Orbit," a feature article originally published in Scientific American.

August 9, 2006

Microwave weapons for crowd control used to be top-secret stuff. No more. Raytheon, which makes them for the military, now promotes its Silent Guardian, a smaller version of its Active Denial system (see MWN, M/A01, p.1), on the Web. Silent Guardian is "available now and ready for action," Raytheon promises. The company even discloses its range, which used to be closely held. It can "de-escalate aggression" at 250 yards, Raytheon states in its best defense-speak. To tempt you further, you can also download a 30-second video, with an up-tempo soundtrack.     

January 26, 2004

The U.S. military continues to investigate what might happen if you were zapped by one of its microwave weapons. Active denial technology, as the military calls it, uses 94 GHz millimeter waves (MMW) to induce pain by heating the skin. The Marine Corps says it’s like touching “an ordinary light bulb that has been left on for a while” —in fact, it’s just a “harmless energy beam,” according to the marines. Not everyone agrees.

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